Super Simple Science of Electricity

materials-electricity-activity

Science of Electricity Materials

  • Battery
  • Small Bulb
  • Aluminum Foil (folded lengthwise and “rolled” up)
  • Tray or table for workspace
  • Objects to test such as a key, an eraser, a coin, a nail, a piece of chalk, a piece of wood, and a candle. Older children can test materials such as aluminum, copper, nickel, and tin.
  • Paper and Pencil to record results
  • Conductor and Insulator Sorting Worksheet

 

 electricity-testers

Electricity Experiment Approach

  • Gather battery and bulb (I used an old flashlight bulb and battery)
  • Seek out materials and objects to test (I found many useful testers around my home)
  • Play on tray or workspace
  • Present to your child
  • Explain the activity in detail and words appropriate to the child’s developmental stage
  • Point to the battery, the bulb, and the foil
  • Ask the child to roll the foil
  • Point to the bowl of objects (for younger students)/materials (for older students) and talk about conductivity and insulation
  • Test objects by placing the object between the battery and the bulb, then touching the foil to the base of the bulb. The bulb should light up (or not).
  • Encourage children to take notes about the objects/materials and their observation

Further Learning

  • For preschool or kindergarten, sort the objects/materials into conductors or insulators
  • For elementary, make a graph of weakest to strongest conductors (since conductivity is a matter or degree)
  • Ask questions about the materials that insulated best, or did not insulate well
  • Have the child brainstorm a list of objects or materials that might conduct (or insulate).
  • Have a younger child roll the foil for the great fine motor work
  • Have a child hold the object or material as you test with the foil (or vice versa)
  • Ask the child ahead of time what objects he believes may conduct electricity, and why
  • Assess the child’s learning by testing a clothespin (or another object with both insulator and conductor attributes). Is it a conductor or an insulator? Which parts of the clothespin will light the bulb?

 

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