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How Communication Technology Is Transforming Indian Politics

As India is a diverse country, political communication has always been fraught with challenges

The 2004 election was a first-of-its-kind in several ways

BJP was the first party to use IVR technology in 2009 elections

According to Author Bruce Gronbeck, the various functions of campaigns-winning the battle of ideas, converting and mobilising supporters, providing supporters informational claims and topics, and so forth-are normally carried out through technologically mediated communication channels.

His observations in 1978 still hold true today. With the ongoing 2019 general elections, India’s political behemoths look all set to duke it out for the right to form the government.

As soon as polling dates are announced, and in most cases much before, political parties start concentrating their efforts on bringing their party into or back to power. During this political journey, party workers and leaders use many communication technologies to get their message across to the voters.

Communication technologies is a broad term used to describe mediums used to communicate with voters – television, radio, telephone, and the Internet. Over the years, political parties have learnt to use all these mediums to propagate their ideas.

As India is a diverse country, political communication has always been fraught with challenges. It is inherently intricate because of the logistics involved in conducting the elections across the country, and complex because politicians have to communicate to the largest electoral base in the world.

Keeping all these factors in mind, political parties earlier nominated ‘karyakartas’ or representatives at local, district, and State level to resolve the problems and serve people better. However, with rapidly advancing technology, parties have realised that they need to do much more than simply deploy representatives.

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