Skip to content
Advertisements

UN staff and humanitarian workers among victims of Ethiopian Airlines crash

3.jpg

Emergency services at the crash site of a Nairobi-bound Ethiopian Airlines flight that crashed shortly after takeoff from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on Sunday, March 10.

The ill-fated Ethiopian Airlines flight that crashed shortly after takeoff on Sunday was packed with humanitarian workers and international experts, many of whom were bound for a major United Nations environmental summit in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi.

Twenty-two UN staff members were among the 157 people killed after Flight ET302 plummeted into a field outside Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, UN Secretary-General spokesman Stephane Dujarric confirmed.
Boeing 737 black box found as planes grounded after Ethiopian Airlines crash

Boeing 737 black box found as planes grounded after Ethiopian Airlines crash
The airline said passengers from at least 35 countries were on the flight, often referred to as a “UN shuttle” for ferrying staff between Addis Ababa, home of the African Union headquarters, and Nairobi, the UN’s headquarters in Africa.
But the plane was particularly full due to the UN Environment Assembly, which began on Monday. The summit, described as the world’s highest-level decision-making body on the environment, brings together member states to tackle environmental challenges.
UN officials paid their respects at the opening of the assembly. Executive director of UN Habitat Maimunah Mohd Sharif, who addressed the summit, said on Twitter: “The @UN has lost many great & hardworking personnel. May they RIP.”
Debris at the crash site of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302

The dead included at least 32 Kenyans, 18 Canadians, nine Ethiopians, eight people from the United States, China and Italy, and seven from France and the United Kingdom, according to the airline. The victims’ identities have not yet been officially confirmed.
Among those bound for the summit was British citizen Joanna Toole, who was due to represent the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), according to the director of her department, fisheries and aquaculture.
“So profoundly sad and lost for words,” Manuel Barange said in a tweet. “A wonderful human being, who loved her work with a passion.”
The FAO, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) in Sudan, the World Bank and the UN Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) each lost one staff member in the crash. The Office of the High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) lost two, as did the International Telecommunications Union (ITU). Six staff from the UN Office in Nairobi (UNON) were killed, as were seven employees of the World Food Program (WFP).
Irish national Michael “Mick” Ryan, global deputy chief engineer for the WFP, was among the dead. Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar shared a tribute to Ryan on Twitter, saying: “Michael was doing life-changing work in Africa with the World Food Programme. Deepest sympathies to family, colleagues & friends.”
Ryan appeared in a video shared by WFP on Facebook last April, explaining his work in Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, to create safe grounds for Rohingya refugees ahead of monsoon season.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: